site stats


GSTF


Best Paper Awards 2016

Best Research Paper


Dr. Jamey Heit
Walden University, USA

Best Student Paper

Ms. Siew Lee Chang
Universiti Malaysia Sabah

Ms. Sandy Buczynski
University of San Diego, USA

Best Paper Awards 2015

Best Research Paper


Dr. Olaf Hallan Graven
Buskerud and Vestfold University College
Norway

Dr. Tim Stott
Liverpool John Moores University
UK

Best Student Paper

Ms. Le Ann-Marie von Otter
University of Gothenburg
Sweden

Mrs. Shaidatul Akma Adi Kasuma
University of Warwick
UK


 

 Indexed By

Crossref logo

and others


Selected Paper Submissions for Oral Presentation at EeL 2017 (as at 14 June 2017)


PAPER TITLE
Educational technology is defined by the Association for Educational Communications and Technology as "The study and ethical practice of facilitating learning and improving performance by creating, using, and managing appropriate technological processes and resources. Educational technology refers to the use of both physical hardware and educational theoretic.
Although transformative learning is often considered to be one of the key goals of adult education its realization in practice remains difficult to nurture and sustain? Efforts to create transformative learning experiences in students have been made all the more challenging given pressures to increase class sizes to manage rising student numbers. This paper draws on first hand experience of leading an undergraduate course and a post-graduate course, both of which doubled in size to become large classes of over 80 students each. Developing literature on the topic reveals some advantages and disadvantages associated with large class teaching, and this paper shares practical experience of integrating the various theoretical insights while retaining the transformative impact of the student learning experience. At the heart of the endeavor were efforts to embrace interactive technology, to incorporate creative mini-exercises and to remain approachable to students. However, while large class sizes were not in themselves problematic, the bigger challenges pertain to the administrative, marking and team-working job loading that inevitably materializes.
Values Education is said to be a vital subject to form students’ character, an essential discipline in moulding consciousness to the changing world and in sharpening their skills on decision making. This discipline also allows us to concretize discretion issues, give support on principles we stand for and transcend misconceptions we used to believe in. In the world context of Values Education, a facilitator of learning should be knowledgeable of desirable behaviours a student should have to count as a good citizen. As time goes by, the constant change of values perception to a certain issue requires higher level of thinking and analysis.
The aim of the study was to find out a method designated to improve the learning of math courses by adding screencast technology. The intention was to measure the influence of high-quality clips produced by screencast technology, on the learning process of math courses. It was required to find out the characteristics (pedagogical and technical) of such high-quality video clips as well as their advantages for improving the learning process in such courses. The research was based on a sample of students in two math courses (n  41) in higher education. Both courses have been fully covered by video clips (not exclusively) produced by screencast technology. Students were asked to answer a questionnaire focused on the characteristics of effective clips as well as the advantages of such clips for their learning. The research results point out that according to learners' views, video clips' effectiveness depends mainly on lecturers' instructional qualifications as well as their capability of technically producing high-quality videos. Such clips covering the whole course curriculum, are advantageous for learning a math course: the learning process is perceived to be excellent, video clips are better than texts, and its substantial flexibility is a significant advantage as well. Therefore, there is a substantial worthiness to add screencast technology to math courses provided that the entire course is fully covered with relevant video clips, and they are pedagogically and technically highquality.
In order to implement the "second class transcripts", local colleges and universities should make fully realistic considerations from the Communist Youth League's organizational capacity, quality of service, resource allocation, implementation capacity and other aspects,then combined with practical, to make the best path selection from the organizational security, system architecture, the connotation construction, integrated, methodologies and integration of resources, etc.
The present study aims at identifying existed educational practices provided for students with students special needs in respect of the number of these schools and their appropriateness to receive such students so as to include them in the elementary and secondary stages in both governmental and private sector. In order to achieve the goals of the study, a questionnaire was built to collect the necessary data of the study. However, this instrument was applied to a random sample of (273 out of 498) governmental and private schools particularly in the Emirate of Abu Dhabi. Validity of the instrument was assured based on face validity as well as coefficients of each item in relation to the total score. Reliability was also assured by using the internal consistency of an item which reaches to (0.86). After calculating the means and standard deviations and percentages of the responses and examining the null hypotheses of the study by using (SPSS), results showed that in preparing schools for students with disability there are no differences attributed to the type of school whether it is governmental or private, elementary or secondary .Therefore, the study suggested a group of recommendations the most important of which are: the necessity to prepare schools and carry out some adaptations to make the inclusion process successful so as to be appropriate for diverse learners.
Nowadays, computers are the main parts of any organization whether it is in an educational field or related to any other subject. Computing education is one of the most significant subjects in Cyprus and due to the structure of the education system in Cyprus, which is centralized, it is corrupted. The major goal of education is to deliver the information in the most effective way/s to learners. Collaborative learning can be one of the learning methods that can be applied to achieve this goal. Therefore, this study aims to examine the Master of Arts (M.A) and Master of Science (M.Sc) students’ perceptions on the effective use of online collaborative learning. Mixed approach has been used both qualitative and quantitative in order to collect the necessary data. Authors had conducted the research with 136 master students from three different departments at Eastern Mediterranean University in Cyprus. The first set of data consists of 44 master students from the Information Technology Department, the second 49 master students from the Education Department and finally 43 master students from the Pharmacy Department. The results show that while the students from different departments have a different level of experience on online collaborative learning, they all stressed the significance of online collaborative learning as a methodology.
Although transformative learning is often considered to be one of the key goals of adult education its realization in practice remains difficult to nurture and sustain? Efforts to create transformative learning experiences in students have been made all the more challenging given pressures to increase class sizes to manage rising student numbers. This paper draws on first hand experience of leading an undergraduate course and a post-graduate course, both of which doubled in size to become large classes of over 80 students each. Developing literature on the topic reveals some advantages and disadvantages associated with large class teaching, and this paper shares practical experience of integrating the various theoretical insights while retaining the transformative impact of the student learning experience. At the heart of the endeavor were efforts to embrace interactive technology, to incorporate creative mini-exercises and to remain approachable to students. However, while large class sizes were not in themselves problematic, the bigger challenges pertain to the administrative, marking and team-working job loading that inevitably materializes.
Higher education in Australia has seen a large increase in international enrolments in the last two decades, with the number increasing from approximately 48,000 students in 1996 to just under 307,000 in 2016 [1]. International education is considered one of Australia’s ‘super-growth’ areas by the federal government [2] as increasing numbers of international students contribute more university revenue than domestic students – up from 41% in 2011 to 48% in 2015 [3]. In Australia, the majority of so-called ‘international’ students come from Asian countries. In 2015, Chinese students comprised 33% of all international students enrolled at higher education institutions in Australia, and nine of the top 10 countries represented by international students in Australia were Asian countries [4]. While every individual has personal experiences that contribute to our understanding of what it means to be a ‘teacher’ and a ‘learner,’ as cultural diversity broadens, so too does the range of personal educational experiences in the student population. Consequently, a key goal of initial teacher education courses is to assist teacher candidates to reflect on their evolving teaching practice to align their beliefs and practices with the philosophical approaches that underpin the courses they are completing.
As technology has emerged, we see institutions utilizing technogly in teaching. There are multiple platforms and tools available to instructors. This article will examine serval platforms and tools utilized across disciplines at Saint Leo University. The article will illustrate how the tools enhance student engagement through the tool.
This paper investigates the influence of atmospherical semiotics and site engagement within an Australian megachurch on young people’s identity construction as part of my PhD study. Adapting from David Kolb’s experiential learning theory (1974), this study explores atmospherical semiotics through an adaptation of this model as a four-stage cycle to demonstrate how young people’s concrete experiences within megachurch and their engagement with the site’s atmospherical semiotics influence their construction of a “new” identity. This study unfolds young people perspectives on atmospherical semiotics of one particular Australian megachurch: Hillsong Church in Waterloo Sydney through qualitative interviews with twelve participants who have been actively attending the church. The discussion focuses on preliminary findings on their perspectives while using the atmospherical semiotics self-reflection model.
The terms gifted or gifted and talented are bestowed students who display a variety of characteristics, including high performance capabilities in an intellectual, creative or artistic area (Clark, 2008). Although certain characteristics can be generalized some gifted students may not possess the same characteristics as other gifted individuals and they may not appear to have the same observable differences. Depending on how their giftedness previously has been dealt with, they even may appear quite “ungifted”. Many gifted students resist routine and exhibit nonconformist behavior. Others may withdraw, and passively be doing a minimum of what is required. These students may have developed an undesirable behavior due to lack of challenges in school being more or less arrested in their intellectual development (Clark, 2008; Nissen, Baltzer, & Kyed, 2007). Therefore, it is important to identify these students as early as possible in order to secure a positive schooling experience.
Computer Assisted Language Learning (CALL) is a widely used pedagogical tool for advancing language learning and teaching. The most dominant use of CALL is to aid language learning. The purpose of this research was to gain insights into the advantages and challenges of using CALL in English language teaching and learning from the perspective of Asian learners, and to explore the connection between students’ different languages, cultures and learning backgrounds and the way they utilize CALL when learning English. An on line anonymous questionnaire was used to obtain qualitative data from twenty participants who were recruited from level 7 and six students in the English Language Centre (ELC) of a regional Australian University. Open coding was the primary method of analysis. The findings indicated Asian students held a positive attitude toward CALL as it was thought to offer convenience and flexibility for their study. However, there were some challenges for Asian students who utilized CALL, especially to improve their writing and speaking skills. From the learners’ perspectives, the opportunities for communication and in time feedback and assistance were inadequate in their CALL experience. Learners found it hard to motivate themselves to engage with CALL. The Asian students’ cultural and educational backgrounds may have triggered these difficulties. The students may also have had insufficient computer skills, low independent learning skills and potentially have lack intrinsic motivation. All of these learning skills are critical in employing CALL. These findings suggested that for the Asian students who were in the process of transition from a traditional teacher centered approach to a student centered approach, more assistance and guidelines were needed for them to gradually develop their computer skills, independent learning skills, and self-motivational skills to benefit from using CALL.
Comprehensive evaluations of health promotion programs are infrequent in the public schooling context, particularly in New Zealand (NZ). Most evaluations measure program impact but few, if any, concurrently explore program delivery or implementation. This study addresses this gap by presenting the results of a cross-sectional implementation evaluation of a social health promotion program, Kiwi Can, operating in low-decile primary schools in NZ. Anonymous questionnaire data was collected from 319 Year 3-6 students in eight schools. Confirmatory factor analysis and structural equation modeling indicated that the program was delivered to a high standard, with fidelity, and adherence to participant needs across all participating schools. The study provides a model for the design of effective, empirically driven implementation evaluations of school-based programs.
This article discusses the results of a grounded methodology literature review on the use of mobile devices by learners with visual impairment. In this article, inclusion in technology is defined and discussed. It is found that little literature is available on the inclusive use of mobile devices and m-learning, even though these technologies are recommended by organizations working with learners with visual impairment. The studies that exist, however, show that the use of mobile technologies as a means of support has significant scope. The study concludes that more research and sophisticated models of support with mobile devices are needed, if learners with visual impairment are to use them most effectively as a tool of inclusion in traditional and non-traditional learning environments.
The problem is, 36.4% of Montana’s Tenth Grade students feel teachers care about their problems and feelings according to the 2014-2015 Student Voice Survey, while the staff voice survey indicated approximately 80% of teachers felt they know students’ “hopes and dreams”. The researcher’s hypothesis was low self-esteem for both students and teachers contributed to the gap in perceptions of care. The purpose of the study was to determine what role self-esteem played in students’ low perceptions of teacher care, as well as the teachers’ high perceptions that they care deeply for students. According to a National Center for Self-Esteem study, as students age, their self-esteem diminishes (Amundson, 1991). Stipek (1994) concluded when students enter school they expect to feel successful and good about themselves. Therefore, the researcher designed a qualitative study where she chose and delivered several self-esteem enhancement activities, and collected survey data from participants in the areas of self-esteem, academic self-efficacy, and teacher support. The activities included journaling, goalsetting, and personality awareness.
Online learning environments are more convenient than face-to-face (or traditional) learning environments, since they provide learning opportunities that occur in diverse settings. However, online courses typically lack the visual cues and interaction of face-to-face classrooms, so online students may experience an isolation effect as a result of learning at a distance, or in the perceived absence of their peers and instructor. The concept of distance in online education does not refer just to a separation in time and space, but also to the pedagogical space between online learners and instructors. Feelings of isolation experienced by distant students are grounded in Moore’s transactional distance theory, which posits that, as dialogue increases, transactional distance decreases. Accordingly, establishing teaching presence in distance education courses can minimize the isolation effect and reduce transactional distance in many ways. This award-winning study described and compared student and faculty perceptions of teaching presence in synchronous and asynchronous distance education courses at the college or university level. A mixed-method methodology was employed using a scale measuring teaching presence for the quantitative strand and student and faculty focus groups for the qualitative strand.
This study investigated the effect of spectrum teaching in a science class. It made use of a quasi-experimental research design where subjects are profiled via the modified regression discontinuity method. Such aforesaid effect is defined in this study as the cognitive imprint and was ascertained by getting the significant difference of the subjects’ pre and post program performances.
The study is aimed at studying the interaction effect of co-operative learning approach and students’ implicit theories of learning on their academic achievement of students. A pre-test post-test non-equivalent groups experiment was conducted on 78 and 81 students from experimental and control groups respectively. The effect of students’ IQ was removed from students’ academic achievement statistically for all further analysis. It may be concluded that (1) In spite of controlling for IQ of students, co-operative learning has yielded a higher mean academic achievement score as compared to traditional teaching. (2) There is a significant effect of co-operative learning approach, students’ implicit theories of intelligences and their interaction on students’ academic achievement. (3) The effect size of the co-operative learning approach as well as students’ implicit theories of intelligences on academic achievement of students is high. (4) Students with incremental theory of intelligence have shown a higher mean academic achievement score as compared to students with entity theory of intelligence. (5) In the experimental group, the mean academic achievement of students with incremental intelligence is significantly greater than that from students with entity intelligence. (6) In the control group, the mean academic achievement of students with incremental intelligence does not differ significantly from students with entity intelligence. This further implies that it is not IQ but rather a student’s belief about whether intelligence is fixed or malleable will determine his/her performance in mathematics when cooperative learning approach is adopted.
This paper reported an ongoing study that examined classroom dialogue using the Scheme for Educational Dialogue Analysis (SEDA) in a computer-supported knowledge building environment in characterizing the classroom discourse and scaffolding further online and offline productive dialogue. Participants were eleven secondary school students studying in a visual arts class in Hong Kong with a very experienced knowledge building teacher. A designed computer-supported knowledge building environment supported by Knowledge Forum was applied to the class and Knowledge Building Talk (KB Talk) was integrated in the classroom. Analysis of classroom dialogue using SEDA was a first attempt to systematically investigate what and how the KB Talk interacted among students and teachers in a knowledge building environment, as well, this study was also an attempt to try to use the analysis results of classroom dialogue to guide knowledge building teachers in their KB classes.
Universitas Padjadjaran (Unpad) currently has four distance education programs and the implementation of e-learning in these programs becomes pivotal. However, the traditional face-to-face is still the main teaching method, so that the teaching costs and efforts might not be efficient. One of the main issues is lecturers’ attitude toward e-learning, whereas it plays a significant role in the effective adoption of e-learning in higher education. Lecturers’ pre-dispositions attitude greatly impacts on the success of transformation from traditional into technology-enhanced education. This study examined the lecturer's attitude towards e-learning in order to design a comprehensive program and strategies to improve the use of e-learning in Universitas Padjadjaran. The data gained using a questionnaire consists of 22 items with five points of Likert scale. The sample were 43 lecturers from 12 faculties. The result shows that the respondents have a moderately positive attitude toward e-learning (mean=3.81). To conclude, a sustainable training program and supports need to be conducted by the stakeholders to improve the implementation of e-learning in Unpad, specifically in the distance education programs.
This paper briefly describes an online interface designed to visualize learner’s academic performance in an innovative approach intended to encourage and facilitate peer to peer social and academic support. The interface is a virtual environment where an animated pet’s emotion represents a student’s academic performance. Three design strategies are utilized for the interface. First, the pet companion strategy that motivates the learner to learn so as to keep the pet dog happy; second, the anonymous learner strategy that all learners’ real name will only be reflected by the names of the pet dog, and by doing so learner will not feel embarrassed to seek help; lastly, peer-to-peer interaction strategy that allows learners either to post a question at discussion forum, or to chat privately when they need help. A pilot quasi-experimental study will be conducted to measure the effectiveness of the interface in terms of motivation and peer-to-peer engagement.
Graduating as a newly qualified teacher in the later 1970s the anticipated means of communication in the classroom and indeed the higher education program left behind, was face to face [teacher to students] and the ‘chalkboard’. Theories of learning were beginning to take off away from the rudiments of rote learning and discovery learning, but the fundamentals remained persistent: didactic teaching, despite the seeds of challenge being there, was the norm. Although recognized by psychologist of the day that children were not ‘blank slates’ on which new knowledge could be written (Ausubel, 1968) this was often the perceived view, with the learner whether a child or a university student on the receiving end of the ‘teacher-as-transmitter-of-knowledge model of teaching (Bennett, 2003. P.24). This transmission mode of teaching was set to change and nearly four decades on not only have pedagogic theories been further advanced, in no small part due to advanced in neuroscience (Smith, 2002), but the way teachers and learners communicate has changed beyond recognition.
Often dismissed as unnecessary in the education systems instead of academic skills, noncognitive factors are now being realized and reclaimed as necessary skills that all students should achieve before they enter the workforce. These skills are called by a variety of names such as social, emotional learning, non-academic factors, social and emotional intelligence, soft skills, mindsets and behaviors, and 21st-century skills, or people skills, yet none of these names capture the essence and value of these essential skills. Although the term noncognitive or soft skills, only implies a lack of value, it was originally intended as making the distinction between the “hard skills” of cognition in areas of literacy and mathematics (Gutman & Schoon 2013). However, a strong body of research (Bowles & Gintis, 2002; Farkas, 2003; Heckman, Lochner & Todd, 2006) now reports the necessity of helping students develop social/emotional intelligence to balance a whole child with a way to attain academic success. This article discusses the need for and value of intentionally teaching these essential skills to students, which research shows will enhance their academic performance, impact the culture of the schools, and create workforce-ready students. Who best to teach these necessary skills other than those trained in the social/emotional cognate, school counselors?
This paper has aimed at identifying the main hindrances during the process of teaching/learning English language in a university with heterogeneous levels of proficiency in English and a wide range of attitudes towards learning. Most students are not aware of the distracting factors that prevent them from achieving academic performance: the smartphone, romantic relationships, distraction to other sites instead of work, lack of personal discipline, ADHD, the difficult participant, etc. What I found useful after five years of teaching is a 30-page Handbook for English Students designed in such a manner so that it should raise awareness about all the above mentioned aspects, and instruct students how to combine individual study with teamwork, how and where to find info, and how to manage time. Teachers should keep in mind that higher education in today’s digitalized world is operating more on constructivism and less on cognitivism. It means that the teacher will mainly make efforts to teach the students how to learn and where to get information from, and what to learn, depending on each student’s needs.
This study involves the design and implementation of a knowledge building environment in a literature class to foster and assess students' domain understanding and regulation of collaboration. It investigates student's regulation patterns and regulation moves between high and low performance group. It also characterizes knowledge-building dynamics. The role played by CSCL tool in facilitating students’ understanding and collaboration is examined. The participants were a group of 18 Year 9 students from an international school in Hong Kong. They experienced this collaborative knowledge building inquiry for eight weeks. The design was integrated with knowledge building principles and employed a CSCL software called “MindMeister”. Reflective portfolios were adopted in this study, both to scaffold and to characterize the regulation dynamics of the knowledge building process. The participants’ domain understanding and regulation pattern of collaboration were examined. MindMeister notes and essays were examined to show domain understanding changes. The analysis on students inquiry and explanation demonstrate the deepening inquiry which move from more knowledge sharing behavior to more explanation-based as they came to have deeper understanding. The analysis of portfolio notes suggests the existence of different patterns of self-regulation,co-regulation and collective regulation in the level from high, medium to low. The qualitative comparison between high and low performing groups on these regulation moves is represented. Reflective portfolio notes were also analyzed with knowledge building principles to suggest the effect of knowledge building environment mediated by CSCL tools.
This study used factorial ANOVA and standard multiple linear regression to address the study research questions with a sample of 450 elementary and secondary school students. The measures used in the study assessed a wide variety of factors among elementary and secondary school students. Data screening identified one outlier that did not have any effect on the results and was not deleted. Regression results indicate that the overall model significantly predicts school leadership, R2 =.264, R2adj = .256, F (4, 370) = 33.25, p<.001. This model accounts for 26.4% of variance in student educational perspectives (SEP). Attitude and attachment to teachers (ATT), educational technology usage (ETU), and school level were significant predictors of SEP while gender was not. Elementary students had a higher SEP than secondary school student. The A two-factor ANOVA indicated significant main effect for school level, F (1, 403) = 24.99, p < .001, η2 = 0.06. The study concluded with a discussion of the importance of computer technology, such variables as ATT and school level have on SEP. School leadership need to be cognizant of the contribution the variables discussed in this study make to teaching and learning environment so that they are fully involved in nurturing a teaching and learning environment where ATT and ETU are used to enhance SEP.
Paralinguistic features (or “nonverbal cues” in some literature) are increasingly prevalent in text-­‐based computer-­‐mediated communication (CMC). These features can be used to convey both lexical and emotional meanings. Research into their roles and functions in this field, including in additional language learning is increasing gradually. Understanding the role of such features is important since misinterpreting either lexical or emotional meanings could substantially influence the process of communication and hence the opportunities for language learning experiences. This paper explores some of the challenges in exploring the use of such paralinguistic features in international, WeChat-­‐based text chats between Australian learners of Chinese and Chinese mentors based in the PRC.
Rural education is a kind of human social activity in rural areas, transmitting general and regional experience in production and life for a variety of people within the regions, inheriting human civilization and rural culture, promoting the transformation of rural society and the coordinated development of diversified industries in rural areas, and cultivating people with modern productive and living ability as well as continuous learning ability. Rural education in our country has four characteristics, namely rurality, diversity, pluralism and autonomy. There are mainly four types of development models: population mobility model, government-led model, culturally-endogenous model and industrial agglomeration model. In the future, the scale and structure of rural education will present the following development trends: before 2030, the pace of education urbanization will be further accelerated; urban and rural education will enter a balanced development period in 2025; education counter-urbanization will appear in China in 2030.
Nowadays, computers are the main parts of any organization whether it is in an educational field or related to any other subject. Computing education is one of the most significant subjects in Cyprus and due to the structure of the education system in Cyprus, which is centralized, it is corrupted. The major goal of education is to deliver the information in the most effective way/s to learners. Collaborative learning can be one of the learning methods that can be applied to achieve this goal. Therefore, this study aims to examine the Master of Arts (M.A) and Master of Science (M.Sc) students’ perceptions on the effective use of online collaborative learning. Mixed approach has been used both qualitative and quantitative in order to collect the necessary data. Authors had conducted the research with 136 master students from three different departments at Eastern Mediterranean University in Cyprus. The first set of data consists of 44 master students from the Information Technology Department, the second 49 master students from the Education Department and finally 43 master students from the Pharmacy Department. The results show that while the students from different departments have a different level of experience on online collaborative learning, they all stressed the significance of online collaborative learning as a methodology.
Dungeons and Distractions is a short film that takes an audience into the mind of a child with autism sitting in a general education, middle school math class. The story was written by Teagen Comeau, who has autism, and who recounts true experiences of the sights, sounds, and thought processes in response to a classroom learning environment. Working collaboratively with his twin brother, Tyler Comeau, who also has autism, they created, filmed, directed, and edited this piece to convey a simulation experience for their audiences. The twins experienced many challenges as public school students and were able to develop critical social skills and social communication through the use of the arts and filmmaking beginning in their middle school years.
This study reviewed the use of infocommunication technology (ICT) to improve the learning and teaching of 75-hour Human Anatomy to second year Biomedical Engineering Diploma students at Temasek Polytechnic in Singapore. These were in the form of interactive e-learning lessons, game-mode quizzes, online topical reviews and mind-maps for five topics, spanning six weeks. The effectiveness of these e-learning lessons and activities were evaluated using Kirkpatrick’s first two levels of learning. These were firstly, the extent the learners find the ICT-enabled e-lessons and activities engaging and relevant; and secondly the degree to which they acquired the intended learning outcomes. Data were collected from 80 students between April to July 2016, through surveys and formative assessment performances. The findings showed that students perceived the interactive e-learning lessons as engaging and improved their motivation to learn. They also scored better than their predecessors for their term test.
This brief article presents the initial development of psychotherapy and counselling in Taiwan, followed by the introduction of art therapy in Taiwan, with a focus on the retrospect and prospect of art therapy in Taiwan. This paper contributes to the literature by highlighting the achievements of the Taiwan Art Therapy Association, reviewing the efforts that have been made toward mental health in Taiwanese society, and providing micro-perspectives on art therapy in Taiwan. The methodology of this paper is a literature review. It is necessary for us to stay current with the progress of the global profession of art therapy. We must overcome cultural differences in the style of art education, religion, and the credential authentication system. Due to the many complicated issues that are faced in Taiwan, people may suffer from emotional or psychological problems. Therefore, the study and practice of art therapy as a means of improving mental health in Taiwan demands our immediate attention.

On the Value, Characteristics and Development Models of Rural Education

Yang Haiyan Gao Shuguo

Rural education is a kind of human social activity in rural areas, transmitting general and regional experience in production and life for a variety of people within the regions, inheriting human civilization and rural culture, promoting the transformation of rural society and the coordinated development of diversified industries in rural areas, and cultivating people with modern productive and living ability as well as continuous learning ability. Rural education in our country has four characteristics, namely rurality, diversity, pluralism and autonomy. There are mainly four types of development models: population mobility model, government-led model, culturally-endogenous model and industrial agglomeration model. In the future, the scale and structure of rural education will present the following development trends: before 2030, the pace of education urbanization will be further accelerated; urban and rural education will enter a balanced development period in 2025; education counter-urbanization will appear in China in 2030.
Connecticut represents a textbook case of lingering school segregation. Despite its small size, 169 towns and cities operate independent districts in the state, and state law allows school boards to deny educational services to children who reside outside the district. This fact, coupled with Connecticut’s long history of residential racial segregation, has led to a highly stratified and segregated public school system.
In 1999, the Connecticut State Supreme Court decided in Sheff v. O’Neill (1999) that the Hartford Public School District was “racially, ethnically, and economically isolated” (p.1). The Court, however, allowed the Connecticut State Legislature to devise its own remedy, and the Legislature responded by simply allowing families to enroll their kids in a charter, magnet, or technical school outside their assigned district (Connecticut Office of Legislative Research, 2003). For a variety of reasons (e.g., procedural barriers, satisfaction with neighborhood schools), most families chose not to participate.
The Sheff ruling considers a school segregated if 75% or more of its student are either White or Minority, and hyper-segregated if more than 90% are. As shown in Tables 1 through 4, 61% of Connecticut students still attended segregated schools and 19% attended hyper-segregated schools in 2012-13 (Connecticut State Department of Education, 2013). Connecticut thus represents compelling case of a state that attempted to integrate its schools but failed.
Classes Without Walls was devised and implemented in this context. Third-, fourth-, and fifth-grade students from an urban community are partnered with same-grade students from a neighboring suburban community. Introductions occur through online face-to-face conversation in Google Hangout, where members can participate in text, voice, or video chats. The partners continue to work together throughout the school year on online projects in ELA, Social Studies, and Science. For example, a Social Studies module has the student partners give each other a virtual tour of their neighborhoods using Google Earth. In another project, partners interview each other and create a slide presentation on each other’s cultural heritage. As a culminating activity in June, partnered classes meet in person to share their completed work at the Celebration of Friendship and Learning.
The nature of the tasks proposed to the students determines their activity in the classroom. The characteristic of the task of mathematical modeling gives students the opportunity to be involved in the construction of knowledge and to the mathematical thinking. Based on this assumption, this study presents an onto-semiotic analysis of mathematical modeling task, involving the linear function, with the objective to show the effectiveness of some theoretical and methodological tools from the onto-semiotic approach (OSA) and, also, to analyze the Involvement of the algebraic reasoning (AR) present in students’ responses. These analyses will allow us to identify the type of tasks that the teacher must take into account to developing students' algebraic reasoning.
Recent efforts in science education in China focused on introducing inquiry learning into courses to improve students’ understanding of science content and cultivate their creative and independent thinking skills. This study investigated how to design and implement a WISE project successfully in the guidance of knowledge integration framework and examined its effectiveness in students’ academic performance. Two groups of Grade 9 Physics students (n=46) in a Chinese secondary school studied the thermal processes through WISE for a month long. Data were collected through pre- and post-tests, Knowledge Integration assessments, audiotapes of students’ conversation, collaborative knowledge products, students’ individual interview and classroom observation. Results suggested that students made significant overall pre-test to post-test gains on Physics concepts, and embedded assessments in WISE is the best indicator and explanation for it, controlling for pre-test scores. And a case study is illustrated how the WISE platform provided more opportunities for students in integrating content and process. Also, this study identified the most important considerations in designing and implementing WISE project in a Chinese context, they are: (1) emphasize the KI processes; 2) facilitate the collaborative learning environments; 3) change students’ beliefs of learning through WISE patterns; 4) provide effective teacher guidance; 5) use the visualizations and experiments meaningfully; 6) scaffold students’ metacognition. Keywords: inquiry learning, WISE, Knowledge integration, Scaffolding, Technology
Teachers’ beliefs influence the interpersonal behaviours they exhibited which significantly affect, correlate and predict students’ achievement, motivation and behaviour. The interpersonal teacher circumplex model by Wubbels, et al. (2012) identified eight possible interpersonal teacher behaviours which represent the control and affiliation dimensions. Despite various findings on the connection between teacher’s interpersonal behaviours and their benefits to students, studies recorded in Malaysia and on tertiary education are limited. Past studies have found no connection between positive interpersonal behaviour and students’ achievement. Hence, this study aims to find out whether students of different academic achievement significantly perceive the interpersonal behaviour of their English lecturer differently. The adapted Malay version of the Questionnaire on Teacher Interaction (QTI) was administered to 128 students of a university college in Malacca, Malaysia. The respondents were categorised as poor, average and excellent achievers according to the final grade they received. It was found that the English lecturer was mostly understanding and least reprimanding in behaviour as well as exhibiting positive control and affiliation over the students, behaviours that are different than the expected behaviour of ASEAN teachers. A one-way ANOVA test found that respondents from poor achievement group significantly perceived the English lecturer to be more reprimanding, uncertain, dissatisfied yet accommodating compared to average and excellent achievers. This finding suggests that positively associated teacher behaviours like steering, understanding and friendliness
In this paper, we present findings from a case study of rural Ghanaian parents who self-identified themselves as having low or no formal education and how they support their children’s mathematics learning in the home setting. Qualitative data were collected through semi-structured interviews and home observation from six parents with no or low formal education, and their 9-10year old children. Analysis of the data showed that parents with nor or low formal education draw on concepts from daily local financial transactions such as “giving and receiving correct change” to teach their children mathematics. Also, the study revealed that the context of usage and parents’ understanding of mathematics as means of ensuring fairness and societal values drives the nature of mathematics support they provide for their children. These findings offer insight into how parents with low formal education from a nonwestern cultural context are involved in their children’s mathematics learning and highlights the value laden nature of “good” mathematics. Finally, the study enlightens us about lived experiences of students’ that educators could possibly capitalize on in stimulating meaningful mathematical reasoning
This study investigated how students’ scientific epistemology can be fostered in an epistemic-enriched knowledge building environment. 22 Grade-4 students in a Hong Kong elementary school participated and studied the topic in Earth Sciences (volcanoes, earthquakes, and tsunamis). The key design themes include cultivating epistemic climate and teacher-guided knowledge building talk, epistemic discourse, and reflection. Quantitative results showed students’ epistemic understanding of science correlated with domain understanding and Knowledge Forum® (KF) participation. Quantitative analysis of classroom observation and students’ group interview suggested how the collective epistemic discourse, reflection and knowledge building talk contributed to the development of students’ understanding of scientific inquiry. Findings of different data analysis consistently showed the positive effects of knowledge building approach on fostering students’ scientific epistemology.
Technology is widely used throughout the world and has become a source of everyday living. Technology has academic, career, and economic benefits that assists with the development of children as well as the development of our society. The multifaceted abilities of technology and the high levels of social interactions that have occurred as a result of technology has brought our attention to the importance of integrating technology to enhance learning outcomes and future innovation, as well as the need to heighten safety and privacy regulations. This can occur through monitoring, training, and multicultural considerations that promotes equitable resources and supports. Therefore, this manuscript will discuss the following: (a) the benefits, deterrents, and challenges of integrating e-learning, (b) how technology access (school, home, community) and usage may influence the technological divide, and (c) a proposed research study and model that considers the most prominent cultural stratifications that intermingles with educational technology gaps currently affecting at-promise (low SES) youth.
Economic globalization has exerted significant influence on politics, culture and other areas, especially changed the ways of human living. Due to the economic globalization, the relation among people are showing n growing close connection with each other in dealing with the economic relations. College education has opened the door to internationalization in the context of globalization, and has faced with unprecedented opportunities and challenges. Therefore, the affinity between the educator and the educatee becomes a heated issue to better answer the question: How can the effectiveness of college education to be improved? Based on the essence and significance of education, this paper mainly aims to probe into the problems relevant to the affinity of college education.
By now e-Learning and distance-learning are no longer seen as novelties, but an integral part of today’s educational landscape. On a global scale, much of the economic data on e-Learning shows us what we would expect based on other markets: the North American and European economies have the lion’s share of the market today, but the growth sectors are in more recently-emerged countries in Asia, Africa, and Latin America. Much like with other technologies (e.g., telecom), these emerging e-Learning markets are leap-frogging the older infrastructure of on-ground education and thousands upon thousands of learners are going straight to e-Learning. But as we’ve seen with many globalized markets, the benefit of more people having access to a good comes with the costs of developing and delivering those goods. Fortunately, in the education world, we don’t have to worry as much about the environmental costs associated with our “product” going global, but as many observers of globalization have pointed out, the rising tide doesn’t lift all boats equally. We should take time to think about how we balance the desire to reach more people with the quality control imperative to ensure that when new learners come into an online learning community, they are respected and receive best we as educators can offer.
This is where the small New England liberal arts college comes in. Such institutions keep alive some of the most traditional aspects of Western education: a devotion to time-tested liberal arts curriculum, beautiful campus settings, and personal communication between professor and student. While we can’t offer the quaint and bucolic physical environment to our distance learners, there are core values of liberal arts education in New England that can serve as guiding principles to the emerging markets of e-Learners around the globe. Today, many of these traditional institutions are more diverse than ever before, serving domestic and international students, students with documented learning disabilities, student-athletes, and students of varied economic backgrounds. This meeting point of tradition and innovation provides an amazing “petri dish” for the industry at large.
This paper attempts to summarize the experience of rolling-out online curriculum at such a small institution, compare and contrast that experience to the broader market, and establish some talking points for participants in this emerging global marketplace.
Didactics of Literature within the Brechtian Theatre in Edward Albee’s Who´s Afraid of Virginia Woolf? and Ernest Lehman’s screenplay adaptation from an audiovisual perspective.
Castillo, Mauricio
San Martin National University, Buenos Aires.
Teacher of English specialized in Neuroscience and Academic Counselling. Presently working on Cognitive and Anthropological Linguistics research.
Key words: Didactics, Literature, Brechtian Theatre.
amcastillo@wellspring.edu.ar
The acquisition of a foreign language has proved to be most effective when all five senses are applied in the learning process. It is the objective of this paper to shed light on the relevance of the Brechtian Theatre when attempting to incorporate and assimilate semantics and novel discourse structures.
It is of utmost importance as an educator to exploit audiovisual tools that provoke an emotional whirlpool in the learners so that speech acts present in a text will leave a linguistic imprint for consolidating new and original synapses. Therefore, the way Literature is taught nowadays must invariably change in order to adapt standardized teaching practices into a more technologically friendly environment.
Finally, I will disclose an ample spectrum of digital resources and videos in order to attain the above-mentioned objective. These will provide educators not only with suitable means that assure language acquisition but also promote an engaging way for creating empathy, tolerance and acceptance of socio-cultural differences.

Singapore Attractions

Global Science and Technology Forum - GSTF reserves the right at its sole discretion to postpone or change the venue,
date and/or time of the conference without prior notice before early bird registration deadline.
COPYRIGHT © 2015 GLOBAL SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY FORUM. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.